Up at MSK with Barbara right now. Things continue to go well in their own one-day-at-a-time way. She just said she feels nudgety, and she’s getting a funny little pain in one leg – which the doctors say are good signs of the next little step of recovery. “Engrafting” (look that one up) may be lurking, like the little boy hiding from the truant officer, just around the corner.

Earlier today we had a morning teleconference rehearsal of Ed and Bill, our first Pop-up Democracy piece. The blast for it went out yesterday, and I am reminding you here that it takes place this Friday evening at 7:30 at Irondale. It’s free, Please come. We need your feedback about this new venture this initial episode of ot , and how this venture works (or doesn’t work) for you the members of our loyal and supportive audience.

Funny thing about new plays. They’re the one place in the theatre where you need an audience to tell you if you’re on to something. Let me elaborate. We’ve all spent lousy evenings with King Lear, Hamlet, and Othello. We’ve come away arguing with our theatre going companion about what went amiss-the acting, directing, or the design. But the one thing we know is: the author got it right. That Shakespeare knew what he was different.

Every new play starts out as a good idea… unless we’re emulating the fictional impresarios of The Producers. Sometimes half way in we realize that good idea has gone astray or died, but we keep pushing hoping for the divine intervention of a resurrection.

And then there’s that occasion where right up to the first performance you think you’ve really got it right, and the beloved people sitting out front just beg to differ. Maybe it’s something as simple and yet elusive of a concept that what you thought was incredibly interesting just wasn’t to anybody else. That is why we have previews, why show used to go out of town to New Haven and Boston and Detroit. What we’re offering this Friday is a preview of a preview. And we’re asking for your discriminating attention.

It’s all happening in three days. We can’t wait for you to see it. And give us your opinion. We’ll be doing our best to follow the advice of two great American authors.

“You’re here to get out and bear witness and provide context, first hand reporting – there’s no substitute for it. Just do that, the rest will take care of itself”.

Ed Murrow

And

“Don’t wait until page 17 or your story or novel to divulge an important detail, do it right up front on page 1.”

And also from Mr. Vonnegut

Pity the reader.

 

Jim Niesen

irondale

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